Published On: Wed, Dec 21st, 2011

How and why seniors commonly die under a doctor’s knife

How and why

seniors commonly

die under

a doctor’s knife

Julian Georgiou, Healingtalks Contributing Writer

(Healingtalks) Every year, nearly 2.5 million people go under the knife for unnecessary surgery, often with devastating consequences (Prevention). Hospitals often engage in practices that are not just profit generating but also life threatening. In fact doctors and hospitals in the United States receive a financial incentive to perform surgery on dying seniors because Medicare is guaranteed to pay for it 100% (Wells, 2011).

This policy is putting seniors at risk whenever non-emergency surgery is conducted that could potentially be life-threatening or crippling.

Under the surgeon’s knife

Colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that 1.8 million Medicare beneficiaries age 65 or older died in 2008, and over 34% were operated on during their last year, 25% in their last month, and 10% in their last week of life (Wells, 2011). During an operation, the patients life and consciousness are put in jeopardy – and just by the use of anesthetic only (things do go wrong with anesthetics) and via a deep penetration of the knife.

Mechanical view of life

The prevalence of surgery as a primary healthcare modality is the result of a mechanical view of life (machines are made of separate., exchangeable mechanical parts and in surgery the body is viewed in that light).  The mechanical view became the dominant vision of nature in the 17th century.

It was initially applied to the healing arts by William Harvey who wrote a book about human circulation of blood whereby the heart was seen as nothing but a pump, akin to the part of a machine. Thus one could have a heart transplant to make the body work better, just as a mechanic might replace an auto pump. This mechanical view symbolizes modern medicine, why doctors wear stethoscopes in icon postures.

This mechanical view became dominant through the rise in the math-bound vision of nature. Why? Because math symbols mostly clearly and precisely abstract separation. Thus a mathematical world is modeled by machines made of separate parts. But what if the life in nature (and thus ourselves) functions differently than according to this mechanical model?

What if consciousness forms a universal relationship of connection (manifesting at the core of life) and is what keeps our bodies whole? This would make surgery an essentially a non-healing art, useful mostly in double negative roles – to not cut apart but rather help sew back together a severed part.T

he mistaken prominence of surgery in the “healing” arts if modern allopathic medicine is then made still more prominent, when financial incentives are added (another mathematical focus) or when this forms a marriage with this mechanical approach to our bodies. High price tags are put on the skill of cutting our bodies apart. Ultimately a great danger begins to loom, however, for the real health of those who are subject to unnecessary, vulture-like or predatory practices. Pockets are emptied, insurance policies are milked, and real people die.

gabriel bross

Gabriel Bross, the beloved step-dad of Nathan Bross Batalion, and
who died suddenly after two unnecessary surgeries performed on him in his 90s

What happens to vulnerable seniors

Nathan  Batalion, our senior editor, tells the story of his step-father, who had raised him for most of his life, who was subjected to back-to-back operations in his 90’s – both of which were unnecessary. They resulted in the immediate death of his sweet dad, and a windfall of evil profits to the hospital and performing surgeons. The surgery was not even done with the medical surrogates’ permission and approval.

For seniors, with their immune (wholeness) system compromised, often then suffer from ‘post surgery pneumonia,’  similar infections and ‘heart attacks’ – right after the invasive surgical operations (Wells, 2011).

Unnecessary surgical procedures are more than common

It has been estimated that 7.5 million unnecessary surgical and other medical procedures are performed each year! So writes Gary Null in Death by Medicine (Black, 2005).

The most frequently performed unnecessary surgeries include hysterectomies, cesarean sections and coronary artery bypass surgeries (Black, 2005).

“Bypasses are the single most commonly performed unnecessary surgery in the country,” write Dr. Mark Hyman and Dr. Mark Liponis in Ultraprevension. There operations are not targeting the issue which is likely due to their nutritional health, lifestyle and consciousness. It is giving the patient larger wound to a suffering body and larger profits to a corrupt doctor.

Coming back to a life centered vision

Healingtalks promotes and encourages a life-centered, non-mechanical vision of nature and healing of ourselves. This connects us to the living, conscious forces of nature that our right-side brain’s thinking  helps us see.

Here are Four Core Approaches that can help you begin that transformation and use the healing energy of natures consciousness.

  • Optimal Nutrition – 80% or more living food, alkaline diet, low glycemic
  • Optimal Detoxification – Avoid chemicals or follow an organic lifestyle; cleansing impurities periodically, juice and water fast, sweat using exercise or saunas, skin brush, colon cleanse, etc.
  • Exercise – Improve blood circulation, metabolism, sleep ; exercise helps both move along both optimal nutrition and detoxification
  • Mind Body Soul – Settle the busy mind, reflect and gain a holistic understanding, keep on track, meditate to instill higher consciousness, inner peace and a healing consciousness transformation

By integrating these four approaches, we develop the means to prevent and reverse diseases.

Related Articles

Related video on unnecessary surgery 

 References

Keywords

Unnecessary surgery, Healing energy, Juice Power, Health and Well being, blood circulation, Mind Body Soul, busy mind, inner peace

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